Pinto Beans Recipe

Pinto Beans Recipe – Slow cooked southern pinto beans that are a traditional favorite! Includes stove top, slow cooker and pressure cooker instructions!

Pinto Beans Recipe - Slow cooked southern pinto beans that are a traditional favorite! Includes stove top, slow cooker and pressure cooker instructions! // addapinch.com

Around my house growing up, pinto beans and cornbread were well-loved additions to any meal or sometimes were the entire meal themselves.

It was one of my Granddaddy Eual’s favorite meal, which may explain why is made such a regular appearance at our table. And my Granddaddy was one of the sweetest men in the world and someone that I, even as mischievous as I was as a youngster, looked up to and revered. So, if Granddaddy loved pinto beans, you better bet that I ate them with gusto, too!

And one thing that he was known for was telling silly jokes and his love of a good Southernism.

Pinto Beans Recipe - Slow cooked southern pinto beans that are a traditional favorite! Includes stove top, slow cooker and pressure cooker instructions! // addapinch.com

A mechanic by trade, Granddaddy would tickle you to death telling a story. He’d get right to the funniest part of the story and then start laughing so hard that it would take forever (it seemed) until he could compose himself enough to finish the story. Of course, we all would laugh along with him because his laughing so hard would make you laugh just as hard. Goodness, I sure do miss him.

A few years back, when I first wrote this post, Sam looked at me one morning and said, “Mama, it looks like it’s gonna come up a cloud.”

All I could think of was, “Praise the Lord, I’m raising a Southerner!”

Grandaddy (and my daddy) would be so proud to know his only grandson knew what the term “come up a cloud” meant and used it correctly in a sentence.

It made me start thinking of other “Southernisms” and giggling over them as Little Buddy and I shared some of our favorites. So I thought it would fun for us to share our favorite “Southernisms” with each other, too. Who knows, we may each learn a few new ones or it may jog our memories of some old-time family favorites that we haven’t thought of in a long while.

Here are a few of my favorites:

  • finer than a frog hair split four ways
  • now, that dog will hunt!
  • living in high cotton
  • don’t hold water
  • can’t hold water
  • comin’ up a cloud
  • fixin’ to
  • mad as a wet hen
  • you better fish or cut bait
  • good Lord willin’ and the creek don’t rise
  • over yonder
  • well, I never!
  • busier than a one armed paper hanger
  • hold your horses
  • running around like a chicken with its head cut off
  • nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs
  • don’t put the cart before the horse
  • don’t count your chickens before the eggs hatch
  • it’s like herding cats
  • that’s a tough wagon to pull
  • well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit
  • hush your mouth or hush my mouth
  • bless your heart
  • dumb as a post
  • as happy as a dead pig in the sunshine
  • I heard they ate supper before they said grace
  • She could haunt a house
  • in a coon’s age
  • like a bump on a log
  • sick as a dog
  • she could eat corn through a picket fence

Now, I know I had to have forgotten some, so please leave your favorites in the comments. I know you have to have heard some great ones, too.

And since we’re talking about Southernisms, I couldn’t think of anything that goes with them than Granddaddy’s favorite pinto bean supper!

A big bowl of pinto beans, a piece of cornbread, and a glass of a glass of “sweet milk” was one of my Granddaddy’s favorite suppers. He’d actually request it on a regular basis for him. She’d wash the beans two or three times and then let them soak all night long. The next morning, she’d rinse them one last time and start them cooking over a low heat on her stove. She’d pull a ham bone from the freezer where she’d cooked a ham last and nestle it down into the pinto beans to make those beans even more delicious.

Her pinto beans would cook all day on the stove with her checking on them ever so often to make sure they didn’t run out of water as they cooked down in her big pot.

Even though I love to cook them all day on the stove, I also love tossing them into my slow cooker and forgetting about them until supper time. But, I have included Grandmother’s stovetop method as well as an electric pressure cooker method! It makes for a win-win that I bet both my Grandmother and Granddaddy would have loved!

Pinto Beans Recipe - Slow cooked southern pinto beans that are a traditional favorite! Includes stove top, slow cooker and pressure cooker instructions! // addapinch.com

Here’s my Pinto Bean Recipe. I hope you love them as much as we always do!

Pinto Beans Recipe - Slow cooked southern pinto beans that are a traditional favorite! Includes stove top, slow cooker and pressure cooker instructions! // addapinch.com
Yield: 6

Pinto Bean Supper and Favorite Southernisms

Total Time 5 hours 10 minutes
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 hours
Pinto Beans Recipe - Slow cooked southern pinto beans that are a traditional favorite! Includes stove top, slow cooker and pressure cooker instructions!
4.67 from 9 votes
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Ingredients

  • 1 pound dried pinto beans picked over and rinsed
  • 1/2 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 medium onion finely chopped
  • 1 ham bone or 1/2 pound cooked bacon

Directions

Slow Cooker Pinto Beans Recipe:

  1. Add the dried beans to all large stockpot and allow to soak overnight. Drain the dried beans and pour into crock of slow cooker. Add in all other ingredients and combine well. Add water until the beans are fully covered.
  2. Cook the pinto beans on high until beans are tender, about 5 hours.

Stovetop Pinto Beans Recipe:

  1. Add the dried beans to all large stockpot and allow to soak overnight. Drain the dried beans and add in all other ingredients and combine well. Add water until the beans are fully covered.
  2. Bring the beans to a boil over high heat and boil for 15 minutes. Reduce the temperature to low and allow the pinto beans to simmer until they tender when pressed against the side of the stockpot with a wooden spoon, 2 to 3 hours. Add water to the beans as needed.

Pressure Cooker Pinto Beans Recipe:

  1. Add the dried beans, as well as all of the remaining ingredients, to a 6-quart pressure cooker. Add water until the beans are fully covered, taking care not to fill the pressure cooker more than half full of water.
  2. Seal the pressure cooker and cook the beans under high pressure for 30 minutes. Use either the "quick release" method or the natural release method with your pressure cooker. The quick release method will quickly release the pressure from your pressure cooker so that you may remove the lid. The natural release method releases the pressure more slowly, but allows the beans to continue cooking a bit longer and are somewhat more tender.

All images and text © Robyn Stone for Add a Pinch

 

Add a dash of pepper sauce to these and you’ve got yourself a delicious meal!

Enjoy!
Robyn xo

From the Add a Pinch recipe archives. Originally published 2011. Updated to include pressure cooker and stovetop instructions.

78 comments on “Pinto Beans Recipe”

  1. How bout,”you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink”! I grew up on good old beans & cornbread & a cold glass of buttermilk to wash it down!!! Have to have them ever so often!!!

  2. Here’s some other southernisms
    God don’t like ugly
    Hold my mule
    Heep sees but few knows

  3. Haha! You never realize your normal sayings are weird until someone brings it up, like “tumped over”, “full as a tick”, “hold your horses”.

    Growing up, we always had this meal, but my mom always made fried potatoes :). When my cousin served this meal to her new husband, he was so confused and he asked “why are we just eating sides?”

  4. Fair to middlin’ when asked how you are – my TN grandmother said it all the time. Had to laugh the first time I heard my hubby say it and now a couple of my sons use it

  5. She fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down.

  6. “I’m feelin sweet hungry!”

  7. Every tub sits on its own bottom.
    Pretty sees as pretty does.
    You are some pum’kin on a gourd vine!
    Cruisin’ for a bruisin’

  8. She’ll get married. For every garbage can, there’s a lid.

  9. that boys crazy as a bessy bug my granny

  10. My Mom used to say “He or she ain’t got no do-right in them”. Meaning they stayed in trouble all the time!

    I’m fixin to start a pot of pinto beans right now, with cornbread and coleslaw. That’s the western NC version of a pinto bean dinner!

  11. Heavens to Georgia! Chile I plum forgot how good it is to be southern!

  12. Sittin’ in butter.
    Butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth.
    Sittin’ in the catbird seat.

  13. She’s lying like a rug.

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